Skip to main content

Coming to visit? Ticketed entry is in place to safely manage your visit so please book ahead. Need to cancel or rejig? Email bookings@npg.gov.au

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Protest!

How can we dance when our earth is turning?

Songman, portrait of Kev Carmody, 2006 Peter Hudson. © Peter Hudson

Rock’s raw potency made it the ideal medium for fomenting protest. The 1970s, 80s and onwards saw calls for social and environmental justice ring out through song: for Indigenous rights, for recognition of the Stolen Generations, for Treaty; and against mining and nuclear energy. Powerful and passionate, music’s storytellers rendered deep injustices visible and mainstream.

1 Nothing's as precious as a hole in the ground, 2001. 2 Preparatory study for 'Nothing's as precious as a hole in the ground'. Head studies, 2001. Both eX de Medici. © eX de Medici.

From 1976, Midnight Oil’s urgent, aggressive energy fired up crowds in Sydney. The Mirning trio of Bunna Lawrie and his brothers formed funk-rock-reggae group Coloured Stone at Koonibba, South Australia in 1977, while Warumpi Band came together in Papunya, Northern Territory in 1980. ‘You can’t change the rhythm of my soul’ sang Pitjanjatjara musician Bart Willoughby of First Nations rock-reggae band No Fixed Address, in their anthemic 1981 track ‘We Have Survived’. And Yolŋu singer/songwriter Dr M Yunupingu formed Yothu Yindi in 1986.

1 Warumpi Band, First Australians Concert, Sydney Opera House, 1986 Juno Gemes. Courtesy of the artist. © Juno Gemes Archive. 2 George Burarrwanga, Warumpi Band, The First Australians Concert, Sydney Opera House, 1986 Juno Gemes. Courtesy of the artist. © Juno Gemes Archive. 3 Bart Willoughby, c. 2000 Penny Tweedie. © Estate of Penny Tweedie. 4 Mandawuy Yunupingu, 1991 (printed 2011) Lorrie Graham. © Lorrie Graham.

Politics, as ever, informed the temper of the times. The Mabo Native Title case was in the courts, and the protests around the 1988 Bicentenary rocked. Indigenous bands made music history, singing in language, touring internationally, and overcoming racist exclusion from some pubs, along with police harassment at gigs.

1 . 2 . Us Mob, Rock Against Racism Concert, Paddington Town Hall 1980 Both Juno Gemes. Courtesy of the artist © Juno Gemes Archive.

Together, Indigenous and non-Indigenous protest rockers created anthems that would inspire future generations. Two hits of 1991 – Yothu Yindi’s ‘Treaty’ and the ballad ‘From Little Things Big Things Grow’ – began as campfire collaborations between singer-songwriter Paul Kelly and, respectively, Yunupingu and Murri songman Kev Carmody. Non-Indigenous Warumpi Band guitarist Neil Murray wrote ‘My Island Home’ about Galiwin'ku, NT for his lead singer, Yolŋu man GR Burarrwaŋa, almost a decade before Christine Anu made it famous.

1 Paul Kelly, 2007 Peter Brew-Bevan. © Peter Brew-Bevan. 2 Neil Murray, 2008 Peter Hudson. © Peter Hudson. 3 Waiting for Zipporah (Christine Anu), 2002 Elizabeth Barden. © Elizabeth Barden.

"How can we dance when our earth is turning?" taken from ‘Beds Are Burning’
Written by Robert Hirst, James Moginie and Peter Garrett. © Spirit Music. Licensed by Sony/ATV Music Publishing (Australia) Pty Ltd

Related information

Jimmy Barnes at The Coogee Bay Hotel 1984 (detail) Grant Matthews
Jimmy Barnes at The Coogee Bay Hotel 1984 (detail) Grant Matthews
Jimmy Barnes at The Coogee Bay Hotel 1984 (detail) Grant Matthews
Jimmy Barnes at The Coogee Bay Hotel 1984 (detail) Grant Matthews

Pub Rock

Your backstage pass to 70s and 80s sounds and scenes

Previous exhibition, 2020

Celebrate the people, places and sounds of Australian pub rock and its enduring impact on our nation’s identity.

The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance

The Gallery

Visit us, learn with us, support us or work with us! Here’s a range of information about planning your visit, our history and more!

The National Portrait Gallery building at night
The National Portrait Gallery building at night
The National Portrait Gallery building at night
The National Portrait Gallery building at night

Support your Portrait Gallery

We depend on your support to keep creating our programs, exhibitions, publications and building the amazing portrait collection!

© National Portrait Gallery 2021
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency