Skip to main content

Coming to visit? Ticketed entry is in place to safely manage your visit so please book ahead. Need to cancel or rejig? Email bookings@npg.gov.au

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

William Windeyer

In their own words

William Windeyer
Audio: 2 minutes

It is not for a judge to enjoy what is generally known as popularity, nor is it indeed desirable that he should covet or aim at winning popular applause. All that he may hope for is, after years of toil laboriously spent in trying to do his duty, that he may win the confidence of the intelligent thinking portion of the community, those who are interested in maintaining law and order, those who desire to see the rights of property respected, and every citizen protected, as far as the right administration of justice can protect him, in the enjoyment of his personal liberty, in his character and in the exercise of his rights. And when the public has thoroughly come to understand that his only desire is to see the right succeed and the truth established, juries may feel confident that they may safely accept such advice and assistance in their deliberations as it comes within the province of a judge to offer. Of popularity beyond this he can know nothing

The duties he has to discharge are often disagreeable, and sometimes painful. Indeed, one of the drawbacks attending the judicial position was that it very much cut one off from social intercourse with one’s fellow citizens in a small society like this, where everyone was known, and where so many who might be known as acquaintances, were frequently before the Court, as parties to proceedings before it. So, one must be careful to avoid all appearance of evil occasion for scandal.

Acknowledgements

Windeyer, William (1882) Speech to magistrates and leading citizens, Wagga Wagga NSW, 4 April 1882, reported 6 April 1882, Wagga Wagga Advertiser, Wagga Wagga NSW

Attribution

Voiced by Tony Llewellyn-Jones

Related people

Sir William Windeyer

Related information

Private virtues public lives

Magazine article by Joanna Gilmour, 2010

Family affections are preserved in a fine selection of intimate portraits.

The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance

The Gallery

Visit us, learn with us, support us or work with us! Here’s a range of information about planning your visit, our history and more!

The National Portrait Gallery building at night
The National Portrait Gallery building at night
The National Portrait Gallery building at night
The National Portrait Gallery building at night

Support your Portrait Gallery

We depend on your support to keep creating our programs, exhibitions, publications and building the amazing portrait collection!

© National Portrait Gallery 2021
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency