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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

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Lindy Morrison

In their own words

Recorded 2021

Lindy Morrison
Audio: 2 minutes

I was very fortunate in the early seventies to be living in a house with a bunch of actors and musicians. It was an extraordinary house where all sorts of tricks and theatre antics were played out every single day and there was one room that was a music room. Basically I just started sitting on the drum kit and started playing. There was a drummer there, guy called Lindsay Arnold, and he kind of taught me quite a bit and had a big influence on me, but it was really the house. It was one of those classic share houses; we were very bohemian, lots of play all the time and it really had an influence on me to become a creative person.

I went overseas for a couple of years before returning to Brisbane, when I did a couple more years of acting, political theatre, before really settling into drums and probably settling into drums because of the political movements in Brisbane at the time due to the oppression of the Bjelke-Petersen government. And punk music being such a significant artistic movement, it really affected me, and I just went ‘Oh my God I want to do something that’s significant.’

I made a decision that my drumming – this is back then – whatever was offered to me I would take, to do with drumming, and every day it would be the drumming that would prioritise my life, nothing else would. And you know I lived that life for many many years.

I don’t think I’m a natural drummer. I think I’m becoming a natural drummer now. There were a lot of years when I wasn’t playing, when I was raising my daughter, when I was directing community music shows, so I wasn’t playing. I tried to play occasionally but I was directing drummers for years and years, big drum shows on riverbanks, and pageants and parades and also community music events but I wasn’t playing, and I’ve really come back to playing now a lot and working very hard and now it’s really natural to me.

Acknowledgements

This recording was made during interviews for the National Portrait Gallery's Portrait Stories series.

Related people

Lindy Morrison

Related information

Lindy Morrison

'We were so lucky'

Portrait story

Musician Lindy Morrison on starting out as a drummer, and Jenny Watson's portraits of The Go-Betweens.

Robert, Lindy, Grant
Robert, Lindy, Grant
Robert, Lindy, Grant
Robert, Lindy, Grant

Face the music

Magazine article by Christine Clark, 2005

Drawn from the Gallery's collection, the exhibition Face the Music explores the remarkable talents and achievements of Australian musicians, composers, conductors and celebrities associated with the music industry.

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The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

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