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Inge King

In their own words

Recorded 1965

Inge King
Audio: 2 minutes

The way I work: I use the welding method and it’s perhaps a more unusual method because I mainly use an arc or electric welder. I use oxyacetylene equipment for cutting my metal and I use sheet steel for my constructions or my sculptures, but I join them together with an arc welder. Well, arc welding is one of the newer types of welding. It’s a rather crude tool because it shows a very heavy texture through the welding mark, you can’t weld very light metal with this method, you have to use fairly heavy sheet or plate, and that requires a certain way of thinking. Well, what fascinates me about this is the sheer flatness and perhaps unattractiveness of the material; that to me is a challenge.

You may wonder why I started on this, and perhaps one of the reasons is to get away from the tradition that I have been born into, and that my background has forced me into, and I found by changing to a material that is so different and so new I could start finding my own way.

Now, my main aim in this is to use these flat shapes of steel and create something three-dimensional, almost architectural, something in the round, which is not always a very easy task, but to me it is a great challenge and one of the main aims in my work, thus expressing certain ideas I have.

My ideas come from the life around me and within me. I cannot pin one particular aspect down, but all I’m trying to do is express those ideas, the impressions I have and the life I live in a certain material – steel – and to be true to that material.

Acknowledgements

This oral history of Inge King is from the De Berg Collection in the National Library of Australia. For more information, or to hear full versions of the recordings, visit the National Library of Australia website.

Audio source

National Library of Australia, Hazel de Berg collection

Related people

Inge King AO

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

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