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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

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The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Henry Fullwood (Uncle Remus)

1919
George Lambert

pencil on paper (sheet: 44.0 cm x 31.0 cm)

Albert Henry Fullwood (1863–1930), artist, trained in art in his native Birmingham before moving to Sydney in 1883. He soon gained employment with the Picturesque Atlas of Australia, travelling a great deal to produce exactly the kind of illustration the publication required. In Sydney, he lived for a time at the artists' camp at Sirius Cove in Mosman along with Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton and others. After getting to know cartoonist Livingston Hopkins, he developed his etching practice and began contributing to illustrated papers including the Bulletin, Sydney Mail, Australian Town and Country Journal and the London Graphic. In 1899 he took his family by way of New York to London, where he exhibited at the Royal Academy and became friends with Bertram Mackennal and fellow members of the Chelsea Arts Club. He remained in London until World War One, during which he worked along with Roberts, Streeton and George Coates at the Wandsworth hospital before being sent to the Western Front as an official artist. About sixty of his evocative French watercolours are now in the Australian War Memorial’s collection.

George Lambert left Australia in 1900 and lived in Paris briefly before settling in London, where he and Fullwood got to know each other well. The two are depicted beside each other in Coates' group portrait of ten painters who served as official war artists with the AIF. The title of Lambert's drawing of his friend, inscribed in a hand other than Lambert's along the bottom edge of the work, is thought to come from the way Fullwood signed his Bulletin cartoons, though other sources state that he got the nickname Remus on account of his entertaining storytelling. In 1920 Fullwood returned to Sydney, where he continued to exhibit and involve himself in art societies including the Australian Painter Etchers' Society and the Australian Watercolour Institute. Lambert returned to Sydney in 1921, but died in 1930, aged just 56. At Lambert's request, Fullwood was one of his pallbearers. Fullwood himself died just a few months later.

Gift of Denis Savill 2017. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

George Lambert (age 46 in 1919)

A. Henry Fullwood (age 56 in 1919)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Donated by

Denis Savill (1 portrait)

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency