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George Lambert

1873 – 1930

George Lambert (1873-1930) artist, was a jackeroo before moving to Sydney to work as an illustrator and attend art school. Dubbed a 'job-lot Adonis', he was envied by his peers for his all-too-rare combination of manliness and artistic brilliance. After winning the first NSW Society of Artists Travelling Scholarship in 1900 he studied and worked in Paris and London for many years, becoming an Associate of the Royal Academy. The only Official War Artist of the First World War to be appointed to the rank of Honorary Captain, he produced immense, violent paintings of the landing at Gallipoli and the charge of the Light Horse at Beersheba. Returning to Sydney in 1921, he became a major active influence on contemporary art and the star attraction of group exhibitions and artists' balls. However, the demand for his art, his own combined ambition and procrastination, harassment by admirers, recurring bouts of malaria and his anxiety about his family in England took their toll and he died amongst his horse paraphernalia in Cobbity at the age of fifty-six.

Updated 2018