Skip to main content

To help keep our visitors and staff safe, please book your spot before visiting.

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Lady Franklin

c. 1850
A. & S. Ltd (publisher) after Amélie Romilly

engraving on paper (sheet: 21.3 cm x 13.8 cm, image: 9.5 cm x 8.0 cm)

Lady Jane Franklin (née Griffin, 1791–1875) came to Van Diemen’s Land in 1837 following the appointment of her husband, Sir John Franklin, to the position of lieutenant-governor of the colony. Jane was somewhat unique among colonial vice-regal spouses for being forthright, childless and well-travelled; for her intellectual interests; and for her ‘unwomanly’ outspokenness on matters such as prison reform and convict discipline. Both she and Franklin viewed Van Diemen’s Land not merely as a prison but a new society in which education, science and the arts should be fostered. Jane accordingly approached her role with the belief that she could contribute to the development of the colony and, in so doing, support and aid her husband in his work. Jane’s energy and enthusiasms, however, were seen by conservative colonists as dangerous eccentricities and, within the bitter political environment of Franklin’s term of office, were ultimately held to constitute an unacceptable interference in government affairs. Following Franklin’s recall from office in 1843, Jane resided in London, devoting much of the remainder of her life and fortune to efforts at finding the vanished 1845 Arctic expedition in which her husband and 128 others perished.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of Ted and Gina Gregg 2012

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Amélie Romilly (age 62 in 1850)

A. & S. Ltd

Jane Franklin (age 58 in 1850)

Subject professions

Government and leadership

Donated by

Loretta Pash (40 portraits)

Related portraits

1. Jane Franklin, c. 1866-1875. All an unknown artist after Thomas Bock.

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

The Rajah quilt, 1841 by Kezia Hayter
The Rajah quilt, 1841 by Kezia Hayter
The Rajah quilt, 1841 by Kezia Hayter
The Rajah quilt, 1841 by Kezia Hayter

Material culture

Magazine article by Joanna Gilmour, 2018

The Rajah Quilt’s narrative promptings are as intriguing as the textile is intricate.

Mary Ann Lawrence, 1841
Mary Ann Lawrence, 1841
Mary Ann Lawrence, 1841
Mary Ann Lawrence, 1841

Fits of delicacy and despair

Magazine article by Joanna Gilmour, 2009

Henry Mundy's portraits flesh out notions of propriety and good taste in a convict colony.

© National Portrait Gallery 2021
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency