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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Patrick Johnson, c. 2000

Penny Tweedie

type C photograph (sheet: 50.8 cm x 31.0 cm, image: 40.7 cm x 28.0 cm)

Patrick Johnson (b. 1972), sprinter, set an Australian 100m record of 9.93 seconds in Mito, Japan in 2003, becoming the first Australian to run the distance under ten seconds. Born in a speedboat off the Queensland coast, Johnson was raised by his fisherman father after his mother died when he was two. Although he attended many different schools, often swimming ashore to do so, he proceeded to the ANU to undertake a degree in politics and Asian Studies. Fluent in five languages including Cantonese, he now works at the Department of Foreign Affairs. After making his race debut in the Australian University Championships in 1996 - the year he began training at the AIS - he won the 200m national championships in 2001 and 2003 and the 100m in 2003, and gained a bronze at the Commonwealth Games 4 x 100m relay in 2002. Johnson has been selected to run in the 100m, 200m and 4 x 100m at the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of the artist 2004

Accession number: 2004.218

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Penny Tweedie (age 60 in 2000)

Patrick Johnson

Subject professions

Sports and recreation

Donated by

Penny Tweedie (47 portraits)

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.