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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Lord Florey, n.d.

Louis Kahan

pen and ink on paper (sheet: 51.6 cm x 34.8 cm)

Howard Florey, Baron Florey of Adelaide and Marston OM (1898–1968) was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine in 1945 for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effect in various infectious diseases. Born into a wealthy family in Adelaide, Florey was a top athlete and gained a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford, where he studied under Sir Charles Sherrington. Appointed to the chair of pathology at Oxford in 1935, he began researching the properties of Pencillium notatum, a fungus the antibacterial qualities of which had been discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1920. By 1941 Florey was successfully undertaking clinical trials of penicillin. He harried US pharmaceutical firms to manufacture the drug, and it saved thousands of lives during World War 2. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize jointly with Fleming (although they never worked together). In 1960, he was made the first Australian President of London’s Royal Society. Florey was instrumental in the establishment of both the John Curtin School of Medical Research and the ANU, of which he was Chancellor from 1965 to 1967.

Florey was knighted in 1944. In 1965, he was not only appointed to the Order of Merit but made a life peer. He chose the title Baron Florey, of Adelaide in the State of South Australia and Commonwealth of Australia and of Marston in the County of Oxford.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 1998
© Louis Kahan/Copyright Agency, 2020

Accession number: 1998.19

Currently on display: Gallery Seven (Ian Potter Gallery)

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On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Self portrait, 1949 Louis Kahan
Self portrait, 1949 Louis Kahan
Self portrait, 1949 Louis Kahan
Self portrait, 1949 Louis Kahan

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.