Skip to main content

Ticketed entry is in place to safely manage visits to the Gallery, so please book ahead.

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Three Dimensional

by Kate Gollings, 1 June 2004

Kate Gollings describes an encounter between three generations of Australian photographers; David Moore, Max Dupain and John Gollings.

Colin Madigan and Robert Hughes, Canberra, 1982 (printed 2000) David Moore
Colin Madigan and Robert Hughes, Canberra, 1982 (printed 2000) David Moore. © Lisa, Michael, Matthew and Joshua Moore. http://davidmoorephotography.com.au/

On a very happy night in 1976 (I think) David Moore, Max Dupain and John Gollings met to discuss architectural photography with Craig McGregor, author of a forthcoming book entitled New Australian Architecture.

It turned out that they were exactly 17 years apart in age. It was unbelievable; we were all most touched by that. I was there as John's partner and at that time I was just photographing with a 35mm camera. They were in the hallway at some stage, all kind of laughing and being silly, and that's when I snapped the photo. It's really only a snapshot however it does capture three generations of important Australian photographers - photographers with very distinct styles.

Max was the senior photographer and his style was rather romantic and heroic, characterised by strong black and white images. With architectural photography in particular, Max heightened the contrast by using a red filter and sought a three­dimensional viewpoint. David Moore, in keeping with his laconic personality, often stood back from his subject, giving his work a more detached or cooler quality. Both Max and David made photographs as works of art in themselves whereas John looked at a building as an architect, which he used to be, using mostly artificial light, in colour and front-on. That night was the first time John had met these two established photographers. A dialogue started between them, especially between Max as the critical senior and purist with John as defender for the architect - they were always arguing. It was unbelievably important to John, in fact John was the one who benefited most from the meeting really.

They were very happy that night, everyone having a fun time. With both David and Max gone, I'm pleased I was there to capture that special moment.

3 portraits

1Norman Lindsay, 1936 Max Dupain. 2David Moore, Max Dupain and John Gollings, 1980 Kate Gollings. © Estate of Kate Gollings.

Related people

John Gollings

Related information

Portrait 12, June - August 2004

Magazine

This issue of Portrait Magazine features Peter Brew-Bevan, daguerreotypes, the exhibition Depth of Field, Ern McQuillan's photographs of sportspeople and more.

Cathy Freeman, 1994
Cathy Freeman, 1994
Cathy Freeman, 1994

Depth of Field

Magazine article by Lauren Dalla

The exhibition Depth of Field displays a selection of portrait photographs that reflect the strength and diversity of Australian achievement.

Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan
Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan
Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan

Hop, skip, shoot

Magazine article by Simon Elliott

Former NPG Deputy Director, Simon Elliott talks with Ern McQuillan about his life and career as a sports photographer.

The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery

The Gallery

Explore portraiture and come face to face with Australian identity, history, culture, creativity and diversity.

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.