Skip to main content

We’re thrilled to welcome you back to the Gallery! Please see what we need you to do first.

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Fred Hilmer, 2018

Evert Ploeg

oil on linen (support: 195.0 cm x 135.0 cm)

Fred Hilmer AO (b. 1945), economic policy and reform strategist, was the chief executive officer of John Fairfax Holdings from 1998 to 2005 and vice- chancellor of the University of New South Wales from 2006 to 2015. Hilmer graduated in law from the University of Sydney and undertook further law studies at the University of Pennsylvania before winning a Joseph Wharton Fellowship and completing his MBA at the Wharton School of Finance in the late 1960s. He published his first books, When the Luck Runs Out and New Games, New Rules in the 1980s and was awarded the John Storey Medal from the Australian Institute of Management in 1991. From 1989 to 1998 he was a professor of management in the Australian Graduate School of Management at the University of New South Wales, of which he later became dean and director. In the early 1990s he chaired the National Competition Policy Review Committee, which led to far-reaching reforms in competition policy, and was a member of the Higher Education Council. Meanwhile, he began his long corporate involvement, over the course of which he has served as a director of TNT, Coca-Cola Amatil, Port Jackson Partners, McKinsey and Company and Macquarie Bank; chair of Pacific Power; and deputy chair of Foster’s Brewing Group and Westfield Holdings Ltd and related companies. More recently, he has chaired the Group of Eight Universities (Go8) and Universitas 21. His writings include Strictly Boardroom: Improving governance to enhance company performance (1993, 1998), The Fairfax Experience: What the Management Texts Didn’t Teach Me (2007), as well as the co-authored Management Redeemed: The case against fads that harm management (1998) and Working Relations: A fresh start for Australian enterprises (1993).

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Commissioned with funds provided by Dr Helen Nugent AO

Accession number: 2018.53

Currently not on display

Copyright image request form
Request a digital copy of an image for publication

Artist and subject

Evert Ploeg (age 55 in 2018)

Fred Hilmer AO (age 73 in 2018)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Interview with Evert Ploeg video: 2 minutes
Interview with Evert Ploeg video: 2 minutes
Interview with Evert Ploeg video: 2 minutes
Interview with Evert Ploeg video: 2 minutes

Deborah Mailman by Evert Ploeg

Portrait story

An interview with artist Evert Ploeg about his portrait of the Australian actor Deborah Mailman.

The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery

The Gallery

Explore portraiture and come face to face with Australian identity, history, culture, creativity and diversity.

Plan your visit

Timed ticketing, location, accessibility and amenities

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.