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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Henry Chamberlain Russell and family at Sydney Observatory

c. 1895
Charles Bayliss

albumen silver photograph (support: 39.0 cm x 47.6 cm, image/sheet: 29.5 cm x 38.3 cm)

Henry Chamberlain Russell CMG (1836–1907) (third from left), started work at the Sydney Observatory after graduating from the University of Sydney in 1859. By 1870 he’d been appointed government astronomer and was one of nineteenth-century Sydney’s leading scientists, photographing astronomical events, designing instruments for the Observatory, and expanding the colony’s network of weather stations and observers. From early 1877 he released a daily weather map – which may or may not have prompted an assassination attempt on him that year. Involved in the establishment of technical education in New South Wales, Russell was the first University of Sydney graduate to be elected to the Royal Society and also served as the university’s vice chancellor. His daughter, Jane Foss Russell (1863–1937) (right), was the second woman to gain a MA from Sydney University and a founder of the Women’s College.

Charles Bayliss was sixteen when he met Beaufoy Merlin, an itinerant photographer and showman. Aged 20, Bayliss began working as Merlin’s assistant. Between 1870 and 1873 (when Merlin died), they travelled throughout NSW and Victoria having been commissioned by entrepreneur Bernhard Otto Holtermann to create a ‘travelling exposition’ that Holtermann hoped would promote immigration to both colonies. From 1874 onwards, Bayliss created a celebrated series of panoramas of Sydney, and won several prestigious government commissions. He operated his own studios in Sydney from 1876, creating a vast number of landscape and urban views – as well as portraits – that constitute an exhaustive, evocative record of New South Wales in an era of unparalleled expansion and prosperity.

Gift of Joanna Russell Maher (née Windeyer) 2018

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Charles Bayliss (age 45 in 1895)

Henry Chamberlain Russell CMG (age 59 in 1895)

Donated by

Mrs Joanna Maher (3 portraits)

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency