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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Tommy Smith, 1986 (printed 2018)

Gary Ede

inkjet print (sheet: 43.0 cm x 29.5 cm, image: 39.1 cm x 25.7 cm)

Tommy Smith (1916- 1998), racehorse trainer, was born at Jembaicumbene near Braidwood, NSW. He worked in the bush until he was 15, when he moved to Melbourne to become a jockey. After a bad fall, he gained a trainer's licence, winning his first race with Bragger, a 'mad brumby' he had found at Cootamundra, at Rosehill in 1942. His first major win came when George Moore won the AJC Derby on Playboy at 100-1in 1949. He went on to win an unsurpassed string of 33 training premierships - he won the Sydney Trainer's Premiership every year from 1953 to 1985 - and collected six Golden Slippers, seven Cox Plates and two Melbourne Cups along the way. Variously known as 'The Little General' and 'The Dominator', Smith maintained one of Australia's biggest stables at his property, Tulloch Lodge. His daughter, Gai Waterhouse, has successfully continued his profession and his business.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2018

Accession number: 2018.105

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Gary Ede (age 40 in 1986)

Tommy Smith (age 70 in 1986)

Subject professions

Sports and recreation

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.