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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

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The Kelly Gang (from The Australasian Sketcher, 17 July 1880)

Tom Carrington and The Australasian Sketcher (publisher)

wood-engraving (sheet: 41.0 cm x 26.7 cm, image: 16.5 cm x 21.5 cm)

After killing Constable Lonigan, Constable Scanlan and Sergeant Kennedy at Stingybark Creek in late October 1878, Ned Kelly and his 'gang' disappeared into the Victorian bush, where for many months they evaded the police and the Indigenous trackers they employed, surfacing occasionally to commit crimes such as the bank robberies at Euroa in late 1878 and Jerilderie in early 1879. On the Eldorado Road, about six miles from Beechworth, lived their old friend Aaron Sherrit (1855-1880), who had been convicted, in the past, of stealing cattle with Joe Byrne. Not far away lived Joe Byrne's mother. Sherritt turned informer, accommodating police who suspected Kelly was hiding in caves nearby and were also watching Mrs Byrne's house. Having betrayed Kelly and Byrne, Sherritt knew he was doomed. Sure enough, on 26 June 1880, Joe Byrne lured Sherritt to the doorstep of his hut and shot him. Police were inside the illuminated dwelling, but could not fire at the outlaws outside in darkness. Kelly tried to burn Skerritt's down before riding on to Glenrowan, where he intended to ambush a police train. The doorstep from Sherritt's hut is now in the Bourke Museum.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2017

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Tom Carrington (age 38 in 1880)

The Australasian Sketcher

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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