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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

David Walsh, 2010

Andres Serrano

type C photograph on paper (frame: 165.3 cm x 138.5 cm, image: 152.4 cm x 127.0 cm)

David Walsh (b. 1961), professional gambler, art collector and gallerist, established Hobart’s Museum of Old and New Art (MONA). Walsh grew up in the blue-collar Hobart suburb of Glenorchy. After beginning a science degree at the University of Tasmania, he left university, directing his mathematical skills towards various gambling enterprises with his long time business partner Zeljko Ranogajek. The pair’s involvement in poker, blackjack and horseracing brought them renown as gamblers and they became the faces of the Bank Roll, the world’s largest gambling syndicate. Walsh began investing his winnings in art in the early-1990s. In 1995 he bought the Northern-Hobart peninsula of Moorilla, and in 2001 opened the Moorilla Museum of Antiques in the modernist home of the previous owners. During this period he continued to collect antiquities but also invested in contemporary international art. Construction of a new museum on the Moorilla site began in 2009. Three years later MONA opened as Australia’s largest privately-owned collection of art and artefacts on display in a public art museum. The years since have seen a very significant surge in tourism to Hobart.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2014

Accession number: 2014.12

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Andres Serrano (age 60 in 2010)

David Walsh (age 49 in 2010)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Installing David Walsh
Installing David Walsh
Installing David Walsh
Installing David Walsh

On the road again

Magazine article by Dr Deborah Hill, 2017

Deborah Hill talks figures with character, as the National Portrait Gallery touring exhibitions program welcomes its millionth visitor.

Untitled #21/09 (after Ricci, 1700; featuring Matthew Mitcham), 2009 Ross Watson
Untitled #21/09 (after Ricci, 1700; featuring Matthew Mitcham), 2009 Ross Watson
Untitled #21/09 (after Ricci, 1700; featuring Matthew Mitcham), 2009 Ross Watson
Untitled #21/09 (after Ricci, 1700; featuring Matthew Mitcham), 2009 Ross Watson

Getting bare

Magazine article by Penny Grist, 2015

How seven portraits within Bare reveal in a public portrait parts of the body and elements of life usually located in the private sphere.

Miranda Otto, 1997 Montalbetti+Campbell
Miranda Otto, 1997 Montalbetti+Campbell
Miranda Otto, 1997 Montalbetti+Campbell
Miranda Otto, 1997 Montalbetti+Campbell

Eye to eye

Previous exhibition, 2019

Eye to Eye is a summer Portrait Gallery Collection remix arranged by degree of eye contact – from turned away with eyes closed all the way through to right-back-at-you – as we explore artists’ and subjects’ choices around the direction of the gaze.

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.