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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Richard Larter, 2004

R. Ian Lloyd

inkjet print on paper (sheet: 51.7 cm x 60.7 cm, image: 35.3 cm x 53.0 cm)
Image not available (NC)

Richard Larter (1929 - 2014) was born in London, where he encountered and was influenced by the new generation of young British Pop artists of the 1950s and early 1960s. After travelling and studying informally in Algiers and North Africa, in 1962 he came to Australia with his wife and children to take up a position as a teacher. Over the 1960s he produced an important body of work exploring social and political themes, often incorporating brightly coloured painted heads of celebrities, sex symbols, dictators, politicians and porn stars in challenging juxtaposition. Seemingly distinct from these works are geometric, ethereal and glittery abstract paintings - indeed for a decade from the 1980s Larter chose only to exhibit abstractions - but elements of these works also fill the backgrounds of the figurative paintings. Working to a rigorous, disciplined routine, Larter has been prolific and his work is held by the National Gallery of Australia and all State Galleries. A major exhibition of his figurative work, Stripperama, was held at the Heide Museum of Modern Art in 2002, and the National Gallery of Australia presented a comprehensive overview exhibition Richard Larter: a retrospective, with accompanying scholarly catalogue, in late 2008.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of R. Ian Lloyd 2010
Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program

Accession number: 2010.83

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

R. Ian Lloyd (age 51 in 2004)

Richard Larter (age 75 in 2004)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Donated by

R. Ian Lloyd (5 portraits)

Related portraits

1. Self portrait with pin-up, 1965. All Richard Larter.

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Pat and Richard Larter, Luddenham, 1970s
Pat and Richard Larter, Luddenham, 1970s
Pat and Richard Larter, Luddenham, 1970s
Pat and Richard Larter, Luddenham, 1970s

Pin-ups

Magazine article by Dr Christopher Chapman, 2008

Christopher Chapman describes the art and life of Australian artist Richard Larter.

Luke Scibberas, Hill End NSW, 2004
Luke Scibberas, Hill End NSW, 2004
Luke Scibberas, Hill End NSW, 2004
Luke Scibberas, Hill End NSW, 2004

Artists' space

Magazine article by John McDonald, 2007

Studio: Australian Painters Photographed by R. Ian Lloyd presents 61 of some of Australia’s most respected and significant painters working in the studio environment.

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The National Portrait Gallery
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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.