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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Reverend James Buller, 1864

Batchelder & O'Neill

carte de visite photograph (support: 10.1 cm x 6.3 cm)

James Buller (1812–1884), Wesleyan missionary, emigrated to Australia in 1835 from Cornwall, hoping to join a mission in the South Seas. He left Sydney in early 1836 and was accepted soon after arriving at the Mangungu Wesleyan mission, Hokianga. He served briefly at Pakanae and then for 15 years at Tangiteroria, Kaipara before working as a minister in Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland and Thames. Responsible for converting many Tongans to Wesleyan Methodism, Buller was president of the Australasian Wesleyan Conference in 1864. He had ten children and was knowledgeable about the Maori; his book Forty years in New Zealand incorporated ‘an account of Maoridom’.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2010

Accession number: 2010.45

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Batchelder & O'Neill

James Buller (age 52 in 1864)

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Religion

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.