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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Mr and Mrs Case

1864
Alexander Fox and Co

albumen photograph on carte de visite (support: 10.2 cm x 6.3 cm)

George Case (life dates unknown) and his wife Grace Egerton (d. 1881), variety performers, made several successful tours of Australia in the 1860s and 1870s. They appeared first in Melbourne in September 1864. Mrs Case, the star of the duo, immediately impressed audiences with her impersonations, singing, dancing, dextrous changes of costume and prestidigitation in the persona of ‘The Wizard of the East’. Mr Case’s turns on violin and accordion were also applauded. In December 1864 they played before Governor and Lady Darling, and every seated lady received a carte de visite of Mrs Case by Alexander Fox. Mr Case filled the gaps in her performances with turns on the violin and accordion. In August 1865, in Brisbane, she appeared in fifteen different roles on one night. In 1867 she appeared as the tenor, Sims Reeves, in Hobart; in January 1868 she took on three separate characters in ‘A Scene in a London Restaurant’. In Harrogate, Yorkshire in 1870 she starred as Mrs Major Buster, formidable mother-in-law, and Miss Judith Clench, ‘the determined advocate of woman’s rights’. In September 1875 they were in Brisbane performing ‘Latest Intelligence’ in which Egerton assumed numerous identities, ‘the rapid transition from one to another is never allowed to interfere’, wrote the courier, ‘the short period necessarily intervening between the assumption of each character being effectively filled up by Mr Case, whose performances on the violin and English concertina never failed to draw forth hearty manifestations of approbation.’ Mr and Mrs Case were still drawing favourable reviews in 1879 in Canada, where Mrs Case died in 1881.

Alexander Fox came to Victoria in the early 1850s seeking to make his fortune on the goldfields. His efforts mustn’t have amounted to all that much, for by early 1856 he was working as a photographer in Bendigo. In May 1857, the Bendigo Advertiser took ‘much pleasure in noticing the beautiful artistic display of Collodion, Daguerreotype, Calotype, and other portraits, to be seen at the rooms of Mr. Alexander Fox.’ The same year he produced what is described as the earliest known photographic record of early Bendigo. Fox also travelled to other goldfields, taking mining photographs. In 1858 he was declared insolvent. Returning to Melbourne, he worked from ‘photographic rooms’ at various addresses: 67 Collins Street, then 75 Swanston Street between 1864 and 1866 and then Collins Street again. These ventures also failed, forcing Fox to seek financial assistance from his brothers-in-law. Eventually, they made their financial assistance conditional on him removing himself from their lives. Fox was in Sydney during 1867 and 1868 and then left for San Francisco in 1868. On his death in 1882 he was living and working in Salt Lake City. The second-youngest of the seven children he had with his wife Rosetta Phillips was the painter Emanuel Phillips Fox.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2010

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Subject professions

Performing arts

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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