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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Gnoung-a-gnoung-a Mour-re-mour-ga (dit Collins), (1807-17)

Nicolas-Martin Petit after Barthélemy Roger

engraving on paper (sheet: 35.5 cm x 26.0 cm, plate-mark: 31.4 cm x 24.1 cm)

More images of this artwork

Gnung-a Gnung-a Murremurgan, or Anganángan (d. 1809) was later dubbed ‘Collins’ by English colonists after he befriended and exchanged names with David Collins, the colony’s judge advocate. Gnung-a Gnung-a was married to Bennelong’s younger sister, Warreeweer (Wariwéar). While Bennelong was in England during 1793 and 1794, Gnung-a Gnung-a voyaged across the sea on the store ship HMS Daedalus to Norfolk Island, Nootka Sound (Vancouver) and Hawaii, where Hawaiian King Kamehameha vainly offered canoes, weapons and other valuable items in exchange for him. In December 1795 Gnung-a Gnung-a was seriously wounded by a spear in the back, thrown by Pemulwuy. He survived by careful treatment from his wife, but died some fourteen years later in Sydney, behind the Dry Store (now Macquarie Place, near Bridge Street). Gnung-a Gnung-a is often mentioned in Collins’s An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, his namesake describing the warrior and voyager as ‘much esteemed by every white man who knew him, as well on account of his personal bravery, of which we had witnessed many distinguishing proofs, as on account of a gentleness of manners which strongly marked his disposition’.

Gnung-a Gnung-a Murremurgan twice crossed the wide Pacific Ocean. He witnessed many Indigenous cultures, but in the end, he was happy to return to his wife, children and life in colonial Sydney.


Dr. Keith Vincent Smith, 2nd October 2018

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2009

Accession number: 2009.84

Currently not on display

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Subject professions

Indigenous identity

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The Companion

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On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Omai, Sir Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, 1775-76
Omai, Sir Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, 1775-76
Omai, Sir Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, 1775-76
Omai, Sir Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, 1775-76

First encounters

Magazine article by Joanna Gilmour, 2011

Representations of the inhabitants of the new world expose the complexities of the colonisers' intentions.

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.