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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Ourou-Maré, dit Bull-Dog par les Anglais, Jeune Guerrier de la Tribu des Gwé-Gal

1807-1817
Nicolas-Martin Petit

engraving on paper (sheet: 34.6 cm x 26.0 cm, plate-mark: 30.8 cm x 24.2 cm)

Ourou-Marae (life dates unknown), also known by the nickname Bulldog, was a Gweagal man, the Gweagal being a clan of the Dharawal-speaking people whose country encompassed the Royal National Park, Kurnell and Port Hacking. In August 1805 he was exiled to Norfolk Island on the orders of Governor King, having earlier been confined at Parramatta Gaol for his involvement in a series of raids on properties in the Hawkesbury district. His accomplice in these raids, a man known to colonists as Musquito, was also banished to Norfolk Island and then to Van Diemen’s Land. The authorities there prevented Musquito from returning to Sydney. In 1823, Musquito expressed to Wesleyan missionary William Horton a willingness to ‘till the ground and live as the English do’. Instead, embittered by betrayal and reportedly shunned by the convict class for his effectiveness as a tracker, he returned to the bush, eventually joining the so-called ‘wild’ Oyster Bay people in their resistance to dispossession and white violence. Implicated in the murders of several stockkeepers on the east coast, Musquito and another man were captured in August 1824. They were subsequently tried and convicted on dubious evidence, and were hanged in Hobart in January 1825. Ourou Marae remained at Norfolk Island for several years before being permitted to return home.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2009

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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