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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Alex Miller

1992
Rick Amor

pencil on paper (sheet: 57.0 cm x 38.0 cm)

Alex Miller (b. 1936), novelist, was born in London to an Irish mother and Scottish father. He left school at 15 and worked as a farm labourer before emigrating to Australia, alone, at the age of 17. After working as an itinerant stockman in Queensland he moved to Victoria, taking a degree in History and English at the University of Melbourne in 1965. He later taught writing at Brunswick Technical School and worked as a public servant in Canberra. His earliest success as a writer came with the publication of short stories and the production of several of his plays. In 1993 his third novel, The Ancestor Game, received the Miles Franklin Award. He received a second Miles Franklin Award in 2003 for his sixth novel, Journey to the Stone Country.

Rick Amor is a Victorian-based painter, printmaker and sculptor. After studying in Melbourne he produced a series of political cartoons before developing an individual, painterly style. After 1983 he began to paint more personal and emotionally charged works, often incorporating a haunting solitary figure. Some of his paintings of suburban and inner Melbourne now number amongst the defining images of the city. During the 1990s Amor was awarded several art residencies and worked in Barcelona, New York and London. In 1999, as Australia's first official war artist since Vietnam, he travelled to East Timor to document the devastated land and the reconstruction efforts of peacekeepers. Represented in most major Australian galleries, Amor is a highly regarded portrait painter and a regular exhibitor in the Archibald Prize.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of the artist 2005
Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program
© Rick Amor/Copyright Agency, 2021

Artist and subject

Rick Amor (age 44 in 1992)

Alex Miller (age 56 in 1992)

Donated by

Rick Amor (20 portraits)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

David Malouf

'The person who is the writer'

Portrait story

Australian author David Malouf discusses the creation of his portrait by artist Rick Amor.

Shane Maloney and Rick Amor

'Big canvas, small head'

Portrait story

Artist Rick Amor and author Shane Maloney relate divergent experiences of the creation of Shane's portrait.

© National Portrait Gallery 2021
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Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency