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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Jack Brabham, 2004

Julie Edgar

cast bronze on granite plinth (including base: 52.0 cm x 25.0 cm depth 32.0 cm)

Sir Jack Brabham OBE (1926-2014), racing car driver, studied mechanical engineering before working as a RAAF mechanic during World War 2. After some years building midget racing cars, Brabham took to driving, winning the Australian midget-car title in 1951. Switching to road racing, he moved to England in the hope of becoming a Formula 1 driver. Racing in a Cooper Climax, Brabham won the World Championship in 1959 in sensational style. In the last lap of the deciding race he was leading the field when his fuel ran out. Undaunted, he pushed the vehicle over the finish line to take the Championship. It was his first of three. In 1966 he became the first driver in Formula 1 history to win the title in a car of his own design, the Repco Brabham. As a driver, Brabham has been described as ‘untidy, but very effective’. Indeed, he won a career total of 14 Grand Prix events before retiring in 1970. Australian of the Year in 1966, in 1979 he became the first person to be knighted for services to motor sport.

Sculptor Julie Edgar, a motor sports enthusiast, also made the bronze bust of Peter Brock in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery. Gordon Darling numbers amongst her other portrait subjects.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased with funds provided by L Gordon Darling AC CMG 2005

Accession number: 2005.1

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Julie Edgar (age 53 in 2004)

Sir Jack Brabham OBE (age 78 in 2004)

Subject professions

Sports and recreation

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Jack Brabham, 2004 Julie Edgar
Jack Brabham, 2004 Julie Edgar
Jack Brabham, 2004 Julie Edgar
Jack Brabham, 2004 Julie Edgar

Start Your Engines...

Magazine article by Catherine McDonough, 2006

The bronze sculpture by Julie Edgar reflects through both the material and representation the determined and straight-forward nature of Brabham. 

Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva
Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva
Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva
Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva

Darling Portrait Prize

Current exhibition

from Friday 6 March

The Darling Prize is a new annual prize for Australian portrait painters, painting Australian sitters. The winner receives a cash prize of $75,000.

Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell

Uncommon Australians

The vision of Gordon and Marilyn Darling

Previous exhibition, 2015

This exhibition showcases portraits acquired through the generosity of the National Portrait Gallery’s Founding Patrons, L Gordon Darling AC CMG and Marilyn Darling AC.

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
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Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


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Fax +61 2 6102 7001
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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.