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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Wenten Rubuntja, 1998

Greg Weight

gelatin silver photograph on paper (sheet: 50.4 cm x 40.4 cm, image: 43.2 cm x 35.5 cm)

Wenten Rubuntja AM (1923-2005) was an Arrernte law man, committee and board member, artist, historian, storyteller and intermediary. He worked across a great variety of pastoral jobs and was renowned as a sharp-dressing, daring cowboy and jockey at the Hermannsburg Races before he began painting and became involved in advocacy. Summarising the trajectory of his life, he said that when he saw the great artist Albert Namatjira at work, ‘Me been forget about stock work – I been sit down with the painting now, till I get to now. For reconciliation and all the organisations, Land Council, Congress, Legal Aid and all that one.’ In 1975, Charles Perkins and Wenten Rubuntja became chair and deputy chair respectively of the new Central Aboriginal Land Council. Rubuntja was its subsequent chair, and in 1988 he and Galarrwuy Yunupingu presented Prime Minister Bob Hawke with the Barunga Statement, calling for a treaty. (Hawke promised a treaty by 1990.) Rubuntja’s life story is told in the strikingly original co-written autobiographical history The town grew up dancing: The life and art of Wenten Rubuntja. His paintings - in both ‘Namatjira style’ and Papunya dot style, depending on their themes - are held in the National Gallery of Australia, the National Museum, the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory and many other collections.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of Patrick Corrigan AM 2004
Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program
© Greg Weight

Accession number: 2004.54

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Greg Weight (age 52 in 1998)

Wenten Rubuntja (age 75 in 1998)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Donated by

Patrick Corrigan AM (123 portraits)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Marilyn Darling AC, 2010 Anne Zahalka
Marilyn Darling AC, 2010 Anne Zahalka
Marilyn Darling AC, 2010 Anne Zahalka
Marilyn Darling AC, 2010 Anne Zahalka

Support Crew

Magazine article by Dr Christopher Chapman, 2011

Portraits of philanthropists in the collection honour their contributions to Australia and acknowledge their support of the National Portrait Gallery.

John Coburn, 1987 Greg Weight
John Coburn, 1987 Greg Weight
John Coburn, 1987 Greg Weight
John Coburn, 1987 Greg Weight

101 photographic portraits

Magazine article by Michelle Fracaro, 2004

Pat Corrigan's generous gift of 100 photographic portraits by Greg Weight.

Margaret Olley, 1991 Greg Weight
Margaret Olley, 1991 Greg Weight
Margaret Olley, 1991 Greg Weight
Margaret Olley, 1991 Greg Weight

Greg Weight

Portraits

Previous exhibition, 2006

Display of 36 Greg Weight photographs in Senate Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Old Parliament House.

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
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Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.