Skip to main content

We’re thrilled to welcome you back to the Gallery! Please see what we need you to do first.

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Billy Cook and Pride of Egypt, 1954

Ern McQuillan

gelatin silver photograph on paper (image/sheet: 30.3 cm x 40.4 cm)

Billy Cook (1910-1985), jockey, grew up in the Sydney suburb of Hornsby, where he delivered meat from his father’s butcher shop by horse and cart. In 1930 he won the Caulfield Cup on Amounis; he went on to amass a career total of 2 300 wins, including Skipton in the Melbourne Cup in 1941 and Rainbird in the same race in 1945. Other Australian races he won included the Sydney Cup, AJC Oaks, Doomben Newmarket, AJC Metropolitans, VRC New Market and the Rose Hill Guineas. Many of his victories were in India and Europe; he won a Bombay Jockey Premiership and was asked to ride for King George VI while in England. He retired in 1959. His son, Peter Cook, also won Melbourne Cups in 1981 and 1984.

In 1954, three-year old Pride of Egypt won the Hobartville Stakes at 50 to 1; lost the QTC Derby at 6 to 1 on; and won the AJC St Leger at 25 to 1 on. These disparate results make him both one of the longest-priced, and one of the shortest-priced, horses ever to win a feature race and one of the shortest-priced horses ever to lose a Group 1 race. In later life he lived in the USA, where he died in 1968.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased with funds provided by L Gordon Darling AC CMG 2004

Accession number: 2004.40

Currently not on display

Copyright image request form
Request a digital copy of an image for publication

Artist and subject

Ern McQuillan (age 28 in 1954)

Billy Cook (age 44 in 1954)

Subject professions

Sports and recreation

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan
Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan
Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan
Betty Cuthbert, 1955 (printed 2003) Ern McQuillan

Hop, skip, shoot

Magazine article by Simon Elliott, 2004

Former NPG Deputy Director, Simon Elliott talks with Ern McQuillan about his life and career as a sports photographer.

Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva
Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva
Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva
Elizabeth, 2019 Anthea da Silva

Darling Portrait Prize

Current exhibition

from Friday 6 March

The Darling Prize is a new annual prize for Australian portrait painters, painting Australian sitters. The winner receives a cash prize of $75,000.

Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell

Uncommon Australians

The vision of Gordon and Marilyn Darling

Previous exhibition, 2015

This exhibition showcases portraits acquired through the generosity of the National Portrait Gallery’s Founding Patrons, L Gordon Darling AC CMG and Marilyn Darling AC.

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.