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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Lew Hoad, 1954

Ern McQuillan

gelatin silver photograph (sheet: 40.5 cm x 30.3 cm)

Lew Hoad (1934-1994), tennis champion, was born in Sydney. He played his first Davis Cup competition in 1952 and helped the Australian team to victory with a thrilling win over Tony Trabert. This photograph shows him playing in the Davis Cup at White City in 1954. In 1956, he won the Wimbledon, French and Australian singles titles, but was prevented from winning the Grand Slam by his compatriot and 'tennis twin' Ken Rosewall in the final of the US Open. He won the Wimbledon doubles titles in 1953, 1955 and 1956 and the singles title again in 1957. Between 1953 and 1956 he won 13 Grand Slam titles, 10 out of 12 Davis Cup singles for Australia and seven out of nine doubles. He later became a successful coach on Spain's Costa del Sol. In a 1999 article naming the Sportsman of the Century for the Guardian newspaper, Frank Keating described his complete absence of 'gamesmanship, meanness or sly endeavour'. Hoad, he wrote, was the very best player at tennis as well, simultaneously, as the very best sportsman at sportsmanship'.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased 2003

Accession number: 2003.115

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Ern McQuillan (age 28 in 1954)

Lew Hoad (age 20 in 1954)

Subject professions

Sports and recreation

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.