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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Self portrait, 2001

Jeffrey Smart

charcoal and pastel on paper (frame: 73.0 cm x 55.0 cm, sheet: 50.0 cm x 35.0 cm, sight: 48.0 cm x 32.0 cm)

Jeffrey Smart (1921-2013), artist, was born in Adelaide. After studying in Paris, first at the Académie Montmarte under Fernand Léger and later at La Grande Chaumière, he developed a hyper-real style with suggestions of surrealism. Over many decades, his paintings explored images of people dwarfed by the strong, simple shapes of man-made structures in urban environments. He painted several self-portraits; this drawing relates to a small one included in Philip Bacon’s highly successful 2001 exhibition of the artist’s paintings. From 1963, Smart lived in Arezzo, Tuscany. In 1996, he published Not Quite Straight - A Memoir, a vivid series of snapshots of his transformation from Adelaide art teacher to successful artist and Tuscan signore. Remaining lucid, he kept painting almost until the end of his life.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of the Margaret Hannah Olley Art Trust 2002

Accession number: 2002.7

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Jeffrey Smart (age 80 in 2001)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Donated by

Margaret Olley AC (2 portraits)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Portrait of Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, 2000 Victorian Tapestry Workshop
Portrait of Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, 2000 Victorian Tapestry Workshop
Portrait of Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, 2000 Victorian Tapestry Workshop
Portrait of Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, 2000 Victorian Tapestry Workshop

The spirit of the gift

Magazine article by Andrew Sayers AM, 2003

Former NPG Director, Andrew Sayers celebrates the support given to the Gallery by Gordon and Marilyn Darling.

Portrait of Professor Graeme Clark, 2000 Peter Wegner
Portrait of Professor Graeme Clark, 2000 Peter Wegner
Portrait of Professor Graeme Clark, 2000 Peter Wegner
Portrait of Professor Graeme Clark, 2000 Peter Wegner

Portraits for Posterity

Previous exhibition, 2006

Drawn from some of the many donations made to the Gallery's collection, the exhibition Portraits for Posterity pays homage both to the remarkable (and varied) group of Australians who are portrayed in the portraits and the generosity of the many donors who have presented them to the Gallery.

Self portrait with glove, 1939 Herbert Badham
Self portrait with glove, 1939 Herbert Badham
Self portrait with glove, 1939 Herbert Badham
Self portrait with glove, 1939 Herbert Badham

To Look Within

Self Portraits in Australia

Previous exhibition, 2004

This exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of self-portraits in Australia, from the colonial period to the present

We would like to thank our partners.
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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.