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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Max Dupain, Artamon, Sydney, 1979 (printed 2000)

David Moore

gelatin silver photograph on paper

Max Dupain OBE (1911–1992), photographer, set up his studio in Sydney in 1934. Through the 1930s he gained exposure in the lifestyle magazine The Home, developing his reputation with portraits and advertising shots, and with his photographs of dancers from the Kirsova Ballet, and the three Ballets Russes companies that toured Australia between 1936 and 1940. In the 1950s he turned increasingly to architectural photography, collaborating in particular with architects Samuel Lipson, Sydney Ancher and Harry Seidler, and documenting the construction of the Sydney Opera House from 1958 to 1973. During the same period he began photographing historic properties for the National Trust, and recorded Canberra's new buildings for the National Capital Development Commission. The Australian Centre for Photography’s 1975 touring exhibition Max Dupain – A Retrospective 1930-1975 brought Dupain's name to the attention of the wider public, and turned The Sunbaker, taken nearly 40 years earlier, into a definitive Australian image. Dupain continued to operate his studio on Sydney's Lower North Shore until he died at the age of 81.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
The series David Moore: From Face to Face was acquired by gift of the artist and financial assistance from Timothy Fairfax AC and L Gordon Darling AC CMG 2001

Accession number: 2001.148

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

David Moore (age 52 in 1979)

Max Dupain (age 68 in 1979)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

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On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Sydney Ure Smith, 1948 Max Dupain
Sydney Ure Smith, 1948 Max Dupain
Sydney Ure Smith, 1948 Max Dupain
Sydney Ure Smith, 1948 Max Dupain

Dupain detective

Magazine article by Johanna McMahon, 2019

Johanna McMahon revels in history and mystery in pursuit of a suite of unknown portrait subjects.

Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams
Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams
Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams
Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams

Painting mates

Magazine article by Michael Desmond, 2011

Michael Desmond discusses Fred Williams' portraits of friends, artist Clifton Pugh, David Aspden and writer Stephen Murray-Smith, and the stylistic connections between his portraits and landscapes.

Hélène Kirsova in Petrouchka, 1936-37 Max Dupain
Hélène Kirsova in Petrouchka, 1936-37 Max Dupain
Hélène Kirsova in Petrouchka, 1936-37 Max Dupain
Hélène Kirsova in Petrouchka, 1936-37 Max Dupain

Vintage Max

Magazine article by Gael Newton, 2003

Gael Newton delves into the life and art of renowned Australian photographer, Max Dupain.

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.