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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Yvonne Audette, Vaucluse, Sydney, 1968 (printed 2000)

David Moore

gelatin silver photograph on paper

Yvonne Audette (b. 1930), painter, studied under John Passmore at the Julian Ashton School from 1948 to 1952. In 1955, she embarked on a decade of travel and study in the USA, London, France, Spain and Italy, during which she mingled freely with the cutting-edge abstractionists of the day. She returned to Sydney, but moved to Melbourne, where she still lives and works, in 1969. In 1999 the Queensland Art Gallery mounted a major show of her works from the 1950s and 1960s, and a successful commercial exhibition followed. Nonetheless, Audette remained inexplicably obscure until 2003, when a major book, Yvonne Audette Paintings and Drawings 1949–2003 appeared. Since then, she has been described as Australia’s greatest living abstract painter. The National Gallery of Victoria held a retrospective of paintings she made while living in Florence and Milan, Yvonne Audette: Different Directions 1954–1966 in 2007–2008.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
The series David Moore: From Face to Face was acquired by gift of the artist and financial assistance from Timothy Fairfax AC and L Gordon Darling AC CMG 2001

Accession number: 2001.143

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

David Moore (age 41 in 1968)

Yvonne Audette (age 38 in 1968)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams
Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams
Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams
Clifton Pugh painting in the studio, 1974 Fred Williams

Painting mates

Magazine article by Michael Desmond, 2011

Michael Desmond discusses Fred Williams' portraits of friends, artist Clifton Pugh, David Aspden and writer Stephen Murray-Smith, and the stylistic connections between his portraits and landscapes.

Harry Seidler, Killara, Sydney, 1984 (printed 2000) David Moore
Harry Seidler, Killara, Sydney, 1984 (printed 2000) David Moore
Harry Seidler, Killara, Sydney, 1984 (printed 2000) David Moore
Harry Seidler, Killara, Sydney, 1984 (printed 2000) David Moore

A Captured Moment

Magazine article by Simon Elliott, 2001

The acquisition of David Moore's archive of portrait photographs for the National Portrait Gallery's collection.

Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell
Andy Thomas, 2002 Montalbetti+Campbell

Uncommon Australians

The vision of Gordon and Marilyn Darling

Previous exhibition, 2015

This exhibition showcases portraits acquired through the generosity of the National Portrait Gallery’s Founding Patrons, L Gordon Darling AC CMG and Marilyn Darling AC.

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.