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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2008

by Adam Knott

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2009 Finalist

Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu has been blind since birth and has become one of Australia's most respected musicians. When we discussed his portrait before the session he said the main point he wanted me to convey was the pride he has for his Aboriginal people. I used the red from the Aboriginal flag for the background and lit Gurrumul with a series of spots to convey the depth of his devotion to his people. Gurrumul's music has been described as 'unadorned' so I decided to photograph him in the same way.

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2009

Other NPPP photos from Adam Knott

Paddy Ellis - Lightning Ridge Opal Miner, 2013 by Adam Knott
NPPP 2014 Finalist

Related information

Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri

Dr G Yunupingu

Magazine article, 2017

Dr G Yunupingu (1970-2017), a man of the Gumatj clan of north-east Arnhem Land, learned to play guitar, keyboard, drums and didgeridoo as a child.

Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2009 Guy Maestri

Yolngu boy

Magazine article by Ashleigh Wadman, 2011

Guy Maestri’s portrait of the musician was conceived after the artist saw Gurrumul perform in Sydney on New Year’s Eve 2008.

Cormac and Callum, 2008 by Ingvar Kenne
Cormac and Callum, 2008 by Ingvar Kenne
Cormac and Callum, 2008 by Ingvar Kenne
Cormac and Callum, 2008 by Ingvar Kenne

National Photographic Portrait Prize 2009

Previous exhibition, 2009

In its second year at the National Portrait Gallery, and for the first time touring to other venues, the National Photographic Portrait Prize 2009 continues to present surprising perspectives on the nature of contemporary portrait photography.

The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery

The Gallery

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.