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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Athlete

An exhibition of sporting photographs by Anderson & Low

Previous exhibition from Thursday 22 June 2000 until Sunday 23 July 2000

The Athlete explores the sporting life well beyond the superficial image of the human physique. These photographs capture "the long range involvement, intensity, focus and drive of individuals in the pursuit of the Olympic ideal."

Shot by London based photographers, Jonathan Anderson and Edwin Low, The Athlete was first shown at the National Art Gallery of Malaysia to coincide with the 1998 Commonwealth Games. A selection of these photographs will show at the National Portrait Gallery Canberra as part of the celebration of the 2000 Olympic Games.

"The nicest comment I heard was from one of the athletes who said everything he felt inside when he was training he didn't think outsiders understood," said Anderson, "but he was amazed because he saw it on the wall".

Jonathan Anderson (b.1961) and Edwin Low (b. 1957) live and work in London and have collaborated as the photographic team Anderson & Low since 1990. Their photographic practice encompasses portraiture, street photography, architectural studies, landscapes, still life, athletes and sports subjects. Anderson & Low have worked predominantly in black and white including platinum-palladium printing techniques. In 1998 their exhibition The Athlete, a collection of 120 photographs which explores aspects of sporting life and the sporting ideal, was held at the National Art Gallery of Malaysia as part of the XVI Commonwealth Games cultural festival. The show is also touring to the US Olympic Museum this year. Their work has been acquired and exhibited by the National Portrait Gallery in London and widely exhibited in the United Kingdom, Australia, America and Malaysia. Their photograph of the millennium dome in London was commissioned as the official poster for the venue.

2 portraits

1Michael Klim, 1999. 2Kyle Vander-Kuyp, 1998. Both Anderson & Low.

Related information

Leonard French, Heathcote, Victoria, 1969 (printed 2000) David Moore
Leonard French, Heathcote, Victoria, 1969 (printed 2000) David Moore
Leonard French, Heathcote, Victoria, 1969 (printed 2000) David Moore
Leonard French, Heathcote, Victoria, 1969 (printed 2000) David Moore

From Face to Face

Portraits by David Moore

Previous exhibition, 2000

Through David Moore's camera we meet many of the outstanding figures of the twentieth century - in diverse areas of achievement - as well as anonymous faces which speak directly to us in these photographs.

Sir Richard Branson, 1999 by David Mach (b. 1956)
Sir Richard Branson, 1999 by David Mach (b. 1956)
Sir Richard Branson, 1999 by David Mach (b. 1956)
Sir Richard Branson, 1999 by David Mach (b. 1956)

Best of British

Contemporary Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery, London

Previous exhibition, 2000

For the first hundred years or so of its existence, The National Portrait Gallery in London had no contemporary collection at all

Monochromatic Self-Portrait, 2000 by Genevieve Preston
Monochromatic Self-Portrait, 2000 by Genevieve Preston
Monochromatic Self-Portrait, 2000 by Genevieve Preston
Monochromatic Self-Portrait, 2000 by Genevieve Preston

Headspace 1

Previous exhibition, 2000

Headspace showcases portrait art produced by secondary students from Year 7 to Year 12 in Government, Catholic and Independent schools in Canberra and its surrounding regions extending to Wollongong, Deniliquin, Leeton, Crookwell, Bombala, Narooma and Albury

Bungaree, late chief of the Broken Bay tribe, Sydney, 1836 William Fernyhough
Bungaree, late chief of the Broken Bay tribe, Sydney, 1836 William Fernyhough
Bungaree, late chief of the Broken Bay tribe, Sydney, 1836 William Fernyhough
Bungaree, late chief of the Broken Bay tribe, Sydney, 1836 William Fernyhough

Heads of the People

A Portrait of Colonial Australia

Previous exhibition, 2000

For Tom Roberts - Australia's best nineteenth-century portrait painter - neither a proto-national portrait gallery nor more popular collections of portrait heads, were sufficient public celebrations for the notables of Australian history

We would like to thank our partners.
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Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


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Fax +61 2 6102 7001
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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.