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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Dissections

Layered portraits from the collection

Previous exhibition from Friday 19 August 2016 until Sunday 27 November 2016

A technologically-precise sculpture depicts an artist. A speculative painting depicts a philosopher. Together, in this focus display, they explore physical and psychological manifestations of self-hood.

Divide (Self portrait), 2011 Sam Jinks
Divide (Self portrait), 2011 Sam Jinks

Divide is a self portrait by Sam Jinks. He recalls owning an anatomical model in childhood – a representation of fragility and mortality. Contemplation of the human life cycle is a theme that runs through much of Jinks’ work. Recent sculptures have drawn on the classic humanist themes of Italian Renaissance art. Jinks’ portrait head and bone-like maquette explore the intersection of science, self-hood and the traditions of the portrait bust.

The portrait of philosopher David Chalmers was commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery. Artist Nick Mourtzakis was invited to create the painting. At their first meeting Mourtzakis was struck by Chalmers’ ‘utter sensitivity’. The subtlety of Chalmers’ thinking and the lucidity and formality of his writing suggested to Mourtzakis the necessity of making the portrait as ‘non-material’ and ‘non-physical’ as possible. Mourtzakis made sketches from life and these were developed into the final portrait. Within the open visual structure of geometric lines and spaces is the suggestion of the softness and substance of a marble bust. A thin vertical strip provides a vector of focus and stability and holds the freedom of the form together.

From 19 August, the portraits will be displayed along with related maquette and sketches.

3 portraits

1Maquette for 'Divide', 2011 Sam Jinks. 2David Chalmers, 2011 Nick Mourtzakis.

Related information

Interview with David Chalmers video: 13 minutes
Interview with David Chalmers video: 13 minutes
Interview with David Chalmers video: 13 minutes
Interview with David Chalmers video: 13 minutes

David Chalmers

'Consciousness, iPhones and philosophical zombies'

Portrait story

Professor David Chalmers explains his interest in philosophy and introduces some of his theories on the conscious mind.

The Long Awaited, 2008 by Patricia Piccinini
The Long Awaited, 2008 by Patricia Piccinini
The Long Awaited, 2008 by Patricia Piccinini
The Long Awaited, 2008 by Patricia Piccinini

In the flesh

Magazine article by Penny Grist, 2015

An exhibition of humanness in ten themes by Penelope Grist.

Curatorial discussion of the Inner Worlds exhibition  video: 11 minutes
Curatorial discussion of the Inner Worlds exhibition  video: 11 minutes
Curatorial discussion of the Inner Worlds exhibition  video: 11 minutes
Curatorial discussion of the Inner Worlds exhibition  video: 11 minutes

Inner Worlds

Portraits and Psychology

Previous exhibition, 2011

Portraits of Australia’s pioneering psychologists and artworks by artists fascinated by the subconscious mind.

Charles, 2015 video: 7 minutes
Charles, 2015 video: 7 minutes
Charles, 2015 video: 7 minutes
Charles, 2015 video: 7 minutes

Digital Portraiture Award 2016

Previous exhibition, 2016

An annual event to extend traditional notions of portraiture and foster emerging artists with an interest in new technology.

We would like to thank our partners.
© National Portrait Gallery 2020
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.