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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Out of the blocks

Early sporting fame

Fourteen sportsmen and women have been Australian of the Year. Here the focus is youth and outstanding sporting prowess – and its underbelly, the pressure of high expectations and public exposure.

Dawn Fraser (AoY 1964), Lionel Rose (AoY 1968) and Shane Gould (AoY 1972) were all awarded their honours in the year of their greatest sporting triumph. As their biographies attest, they were outstanding athletes in their respective fields; however, all three struggled against intrusive public glare and the expectations that accrue with fame. In those days, there was no support for athletes making the difficult transition to retirement from elite level sport with the attendant loss of sporting identity. Yet they emerged as resilient individuals – Lionel Rose as a mentor to younger boxers and a Top of the Pops crooner; Dawn Fraser, the colourful Balmain politician and publican; and Shane Gould, as an organic farmer and now a water safety campaigner. 

Cathy Freeman is the only Australian to have been honoured with both Young Australian of the Year in 1990 and Australian of the Year in 1998. For many Australians, she was the face of reconciliation in the lead up to, and during, the Sydney Olympics. She retired in 2003 and set up the Cathy Freeman Foundation.

In 2000, Dawn Fraser, Shane Gould and Cathy Freeman were among seven Australian women Olympians involved in lighting the cauldron at the opening of the Sydney Olympic Games.

Photographer Joseph Tunzi captured a rare moment – Elvis visiting Lionel Rose during his training session in Los Angeles in 1968. Rose reminisced:

I was punching a heavy bag in a gym in L.A. and I hear this voice sing out, “Hey, Lionel! What’s doin’?” And it was Elvis himself … I was in awe of him but he said he was in awe of me.

5 portraits

1 Dawn Fraser, 1998 (printed 2001) Peter Brew-Bevan. © Peter Brew-Bevan. 2 Cathy Freeman, 1994 (printed 2010) Bill McAuley. © Bill McAuley.

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Lowitja O'Donoghue
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Awesome Achievers

A cross-curriculum learning resource

Learning resources

What makes someone awesome? And how does a portrait tell a person's story? Bring your students up close and personal with some great Australians. For upper primary school students.

The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance
The National Portrait Gallery building front entrance

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Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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