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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Beards

Magnificent moustaches, bold beards and masterful muttonchops, it's all here in Jo's Mo Show.

The Brougham
The Brougham
The Brougham
The Brougham

The Brougham

A philosopher-style of beard – thick and lengthy; a greyer, hence wiser version of the Burke; and suited to older men who saw themselves as sagacious or statesmanlike.

The Burke
The Burke
The Burke
The Burke

The Burke

A big daddy of a beard; long; bushy; rugged, but not unkempt; typically found on the faces of explorers or bushrangers.

The Parkes
The Parkes
The Parkes
The Parkes

The Parkes

It wasn’t uncommon for the pro-beard fraternity of the mid nineteenth century to cite beards as a sign of wisdom on the grounds that Socrates and other ancient philosophers had worn them.

The Lyster
The Lyster
The Lyster
The Lyster

The Lyster

A strong, silent type of beard; bushy and manly, but also shaped and contained, a restrained version of a Burke or a Parkes.

The Hooker
The Hooker
The Hooker
The Hooker

The Hooker

Not unlike the style famously observed by Abraham Lincoln, the Hooker consists of a furry chinstrap, starting alongside the ears, clinging to the ridge of jawbone and joining at the chin.

The Lambert
The Lambert
The Lambert
The Lambert

The Lambert

Barbering manuals of the turn of the century might describe this style as a ‘Van Dyck’, named after the Dutch painter Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641) who is known to have adopted this look.

The Cohen
The Cohen
The Cohen
The Cohen

The Cohen

Somewhat like the Lambert but more avuncular, more businesslike, less dandified or effete – the sort of style you’d expect to see on a bank manager in the 1920s.

The Hubert
The Hubert
The Hubert
The Hubert

The Hubert

A facial hair style suggesting something of the boys’-own type of chap who seems to have had much currency in the early years of the twentieth century.

The Gibb
The Gibb
The Gibb
The Gibb

The Gibb

The 1950s are popularly thought of as an uptight, conservative time when men were clean-cut, brylcreemed and clean-shaven.

Related information

Henry Lawson, c. 1919 Lionel Lindsay
Henry Lawson, c. 1919 Lionel Lindsay
Henry Lawson, c. 1919 Lionel Lindsay
Henry Lawson, c. 1919 Lionel Lindsay

Jo's mo show

(with beards)

Previous exhibition, 2011

This exhibition illustrates changes in beards, moustaches and sideburns from the 1780s to the 1980s.

The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.