Skip to main content

Coming to visit? Ticketed entry is in place to safely manage your visit so please book ahead. Need to cancel or rejig? Email bookings@npg.gov.au

Menu

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Inge King

1968
Mark Strizic

gelatin silver photograph on paper (sheet: 29.0 cm x 39.8 cm, image: 26.5 cm x 38.0 cm)

Inge King AO (1915–2016) was at the forefront of the development of non-figurative sculpture in Australia and remained one of Australia’s outstanding sculptors into her 80s – a time in her life during which she continued to develop innovative work. Born in Berlin, King studied sculpture in Germany before fleeing to England after Kristallnacht in late 1938. After further study in Glasgow, she settled permanently in Australia in 1951, becoming one of the founding members of the influential 'Centre 5' group whose stated aim was to 'help foster greater public awareness of contemporary sculpture in Australia'. The group also advocated the advancement of abstraction in sculpture, which by the 1970s was characterised by the use of industrial techniques and materials such as sheet steel. Inge King held more than 26 solo exhibitions, including a retrospective at the National Gallery of Victoria in 1992 and one at the National Gallery of Australia in 2015, and she participated in more than 60 group shows in London, New York, Australia and New Zealand.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Purchased with funds from the Basil Bressler Bequest 2003
© Estate of Mark Strizic

Artist and subject

Mark Strizic (age 40 in 1968)

Inge King AO (age 50 in 1968)

Subject professions

Visual arts and crafts

Supported by

Basil P. Bressler (48 portraits supported)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Mark McManus as Will by Mark Strizic
Mark McManus as Will by Mark Strizic
Mark McManus as Will by Mark Strizic
Mark McManus as Will by Mark Strizic

In and out of focus

Magazine article by Gael Newton, 2017

Gael Newton looks at Australian photography, film and the sixties through the novel lens of Mark Strizic.

Clifton Pugh and John Olsen, Dunmoochin
Clifton Pugh and John Olsen, Dunmoochin
Clifton Pugh and John Olsen, Dunmoochin
Clifton Pugh and John Olsen, Dunmoochin

Poet of the Fleeting Moment

Magazine article by Simon Elliott, 2004

Mark Strizic's work crosses a broad spectrum of photographic fields including urban, industrial, commercial, and architectural photography. 

© National Portrait Gallery 2021
King Edward Terrace, Parkes
Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency