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Mungo MacCallum, press gallery cricket

1973
Frank Hinder

fibre-tipped pen on paper (24.3 cm x 19.6 cm)

Mungo MacCallum (1941–2020) was one of Australia's best-known political journalists. A descendant of William Charles Wentworth and the nephew of long-serving Liberal politician Bill Wentworth, the left-leaning MacCallum was once described by Gough Whitlam as the 'lunatic son of the Australian political aristocracy'. MacCallum emerged as one of the most colourful and astute members of the Canberra press gallery during the tumultuous years of the Gorton, Whitlam and Fraser governments. He wrote prolifically, contributing to most major Australian political papers, journals and platforms including The National Review, The National Times, The Australian, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Monthly and The Drum. He also devised a weekly cryptic crossword for The Saturday Paper. Among his several books were Mungo: the man who laughs (2001), autobiographical account of Australian politics in the post-Holt years; and How To Be A Megalomaniac (2002), an instructional guide for aspiring politicians. MacCallum’s later books included Poll Dancing (2007) and Punch and Judy: The Double Disillusion Election of 2010 (2011).

The caption on this drawing references the regular cricket matches played between members of the press gallery and politicians during the 1970s and 1980s. As a rule, they both fielded very ordinary cricket sides.

Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of Enid Hawkins 2003
Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program
© Enid Hawkins (nee Hinder)

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Frank Hinder (age 67 in 1973)

Mungo MacCallum (age 32 in 1973)

Subject professions

Media and communications

Donated by

Enid Hawkins (6 portraits)

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

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The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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