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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

Some lads I (Russell Page), 1986

Tracey Moffatt

gelatin silver photograph on paper (frame: 65.1 cm x 62.9 cm depth 1.9 cm, sheet: 42.0 cm x 41.9 cm)

Russell Page (1968–2002), choreographer, dancer and actor, was a man of the Nunukl (Noonuccal) people and the Munaldjali clan of the Yugambeh people of south-east Queensland. Page and his eleven siblings grew up in Mount Gravatt, Brisbane. Russell was a brilliant rugby league player, but shifted his focus to dancing, training at the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association College before touring with the One Extra Dance Company. Co-founder and principal artist of the Bangarra Dance Theatre from 1991, he represented Australia at the 1997 Venice Biennale and appeared in the opening and closing ceremonies of the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000. Among his screen and television appearances was a role in Bedevil, directed by Tracey Moffatt. His last stage performance was in the Bangarra production Walkabout, directed by his brother, Stephen. Russell Page took his own life at the age of 34, plunging his own large family and the broader Australian arts community into mourning. (Another brother, David, who was Bangarra’s music director, died in 2016.) Stephen Page remains the artistic director of Bangarra.

Tracy Moffatt took this photograph when Russell Page was with the Aboriginal and Islander Dance Theatre in Sydney. It is part of the series Some Lads, depicting dance students from the company.

Courtesy of the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney.
Collection: National Portrait Gallery
Gift of the artist 1998
Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program
© Tracey Moffatt

Accession number: 1998.11

Currently not on display

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Artist and subject

Tracey Moffatt (age 26 in 1986)

Russell Page (age 18 in 1986)

Subject professions

Performing arts

Donated by

Tracey Moffatt (2 portraits)

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Self portrait, 1999/2005 Tracey Moffatt
Self portrait, 1999/2005 Tracey Moffatt
Self portrait, 1999/2005 Tracey Moffatt
Self portrait, 1999/2005 Tracey Moffatt

Home truths

Magazine article by Joanna Gilmour, 2013

Despite once expressing a limited interest in the self portrait, the idea of it has figured strongly in much of Tracey Moffatt's work and has done so in some of her most distinctive and compelling images.

Self-portrait, 1999
Self-portrait, 1999
Self-portrait, 1999
Self-portrait, 1999

A self-portrait in focus

Magazine article by Kim Appleby, 2002

In her self-portrait, Tracey Moffatt presents herself as her work.

Bryan Brown, 2008 Adam Knott
Bryan Brown, 2008 Adam Knott
Bryan Brown, 2008 Adam Knott
Bryan Brown, 2008 Adam Knott

The Look

Previous exhibition, 2019

Featuring striking photographic portraits of contemporary figures from the National Portrait Gallery collection, The Look is an aesthetic treat with a lashing of je ne sais quoi.

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© National Portrait Gallery 2020
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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.