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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

On display in Gallery Three

Robert Oatley Gallery

Corroboree, or Dance of the Natives of New South Wales, 1820 Walter Preston
Corroboree, or Dance of the Natives of New South Wales, 1820 Walter Preston

Facing New Worlds

The story of Australia’s settlement is often told as one starting in 1788 with the arrival of a fleet of British convict ships. These ships, captained by Arthur Phillip, came both to solve a crisis in the prison system back home and to rebuild the empire after losing thirteen American colonies a decade earlier.  This common story also often assumes that Britons easily overpowered or pushed back the Indigenous peoples already here. But the British settlement of Australia was the result of a general European push into the Pacific region that started as early as the 1760s. And the colonization of Indigenous lands and bodies was neither simple nor straightforward.

Facing New Worlds moves away from a focus on significant individual Europeans in the colonization of our region. Instead, it highlights the way that Europeans had to negotiate with Indigenous interlocutors to achieve anything. The portraits here illustrate those negotiations in their pairings of Europeans and Indigenous people. They also remind us that all portraiture is a representation of a relationship between sitter and artist. Indigenous people were not passive victims of European force, but fought, engaged, and shaped European intentions all through the so-called Age of Exploration. They also faced more than just the British during this era; they had to face French incursions quite as often. European exploration in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries opened up new worlds for everyone involved.

1Trucaninny [Trukanini], wife of Woureddy [Wurati], 1836. 2Woureddy [Wurati], an Aboriginal Chief of Van Diemen's Land, 1835. Both Benjamin Law.

Related people

Mr Robert Oatley AO

Related information

Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber
Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber
Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber
Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber

Cook in context

Magazine article by Diana Warnes, 2007

Robert Oatley's continuing benefaction has helped the National Portrait Gallery acquire works that add another layer to the story of Captain Cook.

Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber
Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber
Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber
Portrait of Captain James Cook RN, 1782 John Webber

The Quiet Australian

Magazine article by Brian Dale, 2001

Robert Oatley talks about the repatriation of the John Webber portrait of Captain James Cook.

Gallery two entrance
Gallery two entrance
Gallery two entrance
Gallery two entrance

Collection display galleries

Previous exhibition, 2019

The collection display includes a wide selection of portraits that tell extraordinary stories of encounter, exploration, independence, individuality and achievement in Australia. Visitors to the Gallery can follow the development of portraiture from oil painting to digital media.

The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery

The Gallery

Explore portraiture and come face to face with Australian identity, history, culture, creativity and diversity.

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© National Portrait Gallery 2020
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Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia


Phone +61 2 6102 7000
Fax +61 2 6102 7001
ABN: 54 74 277 1196

The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.